Tantré Work Party September 23, 2007

         The work part of work party

Something wonderful about what Deb and Richard do with Tantré Farm is connect their community with where food comes from.  They give tours and host events and workshops, they have member work days and potlucks three times each season. People are invited to come to the farm to visit or help out pretty much any time (with a little advance notice). 


If you're obsessed with food (like I am), and even if you have a kitchen garden (which I do), it's amazing to see food being grown on what seems like a very large scale. To see the acres where your potatoes grew and dig a few bushels of them yourself and then go home exhausted because you spent just one hour doing hard physical labor gives a very healthy perspective on why small organic farms can't produce food as cheaply as agribusiness can. 


At the work party on the 23rd I spent an hour pruning back tall fennel stems and releasing an herb garden from the dark under the weeds.  Pulling tall weeds is totally gratifying. The weeds and fennel all went into the chicken pen. Apparently everything goes into the chicken pen. 


Other parts of the work party included: my favorite part - potluck. Amazing roasted potatoes, salads, homemade pickles, and blackberry cobbler that I didn't have any of. I made the raspberry muffin recipe I got from Mrs. Makielski. 


Also part of the work party - an edible farm tour, visiting the cows and goats, picking your own flower bouquet. For kids there was queuing up for a chance to swing on the huge tire swing, playing tea-party in the remains of the sunflower teepee, splashing in the wading pool, running around and screeching like a banshee, watching hypnotized while the calico cat eats the rest of your potato salad. 


Mark, who splits the farm share with us this year, was there with his two girls. They've come to every event at Tantre so far because as Mark says "the girls absolutely love it here."  They saddle up with a posse of other little kids and you don't see them again until somebody needs to leave. They kick off their shoes and run barefoot just like back when I was alive. 

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